Give the Gift of Sight

In Ethiopia, 500,000 people suffer from preventable blindness due to cataracts. Most of these people have very restricted mobility, both at home and in the community, and are unable to be self-reliant. Blind people are easily burned using the common wood burning stoves found in most Ethiopian homes. Many children, especially girls, are forced to care for blind relatives, keeping them from attending school or playing with friends. Depression and isolation are common among the blind.

Your $75 donation can completely restore eyesight for one person!!

Our cataract screenings in the Debra Zeit Region have identified over 1,000 people in need of cataract surgery, who are unable to afford this simple procedure. To date, our team of physicians has restored sight for 273 of those 1,000.

Our Giving Tuesday campaign goal is to raise $20,000 to help us restore the eyesight for our remaining 727 blind friends in Ethiopia. Your $75 donation not only restores eyesight, it improves mobility, emotional and mental health, and overall quality of life for the recipient and their families. This same donation also covers transportation, hospital fees, doctors and nurses’ fees, food, medications, and aftercare!

And, when you donate on December 3, your $1 becomes $3! A very generous donor will MATCH YOUR DONATION to make your money go father!! That’s not all! Facebook will match your donation as well if you donate on our Facebook page! 

  

They Cried When They Saw Each Other

Midesko and Urgo, a blind husband and wife, receive cataract surgery together

Midesko and Urgo are a blind husband and wife that became blind at the same time due to eye disease, probably from bacteria, that was not cared for. For ten years they had to live with and rely on family members for their basic needs. During our screenings we discovered that both of them had cataracts and scheduled them for surgery.

“Diana Bingham, Engage Now Africa’s Ethiopia Country Director, said, “This cute couple came together on the same day, eagerly anticipating the surgery that would finally allow them to see one another.” The day after their surgery they were able to remove their bandages, and a tender moment was experienced by all as this sweet couple beheld each other and their beautiful grandchildren, many of whom they had never been able to see, and some of whom had been caring for them for years.  

“It was so rewarding to see them walk out hand in hand, not because they were taking care of one another, but because they were actually able to see one another and walk out of the hospital together.”

Midesko and Urgo walking out of surgery together

It was so rewarding to see them walk out hand in hand, not because they were taking care of one another, but because they were actually able to see one another and walk out of the hospital together.

Diana Bingham, Volunteer